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Resources

Tech Tickets


Families face all kinds of challenges. Do not let technology be a challenge that goes unaddressed with your children. Here is a fun way to start! Download or pick up a free Tech Ticket Board at the Glenwood STAND@Home Center. This is a fun way to help your children set boundaries and guide them into understanding the need for control. Here is how it works:

Download:

Tech Tickets Board
Tech Tickerts

The Rules

  1. Each child receives 12 tickets every Sunday Night
  2. To use any of the tech devices, give a ticket to Mom or Dad and they will set the timer for 30 min.
  3. If somebody else is watching TV and you want to join, you will also have to turn in a ticket.
  4. When the timer goes off, tech time is OVER.
  5. Once the Tickets are gone you do not get any more tickets until the next Sunday night. (Unless you earn more).
  6. Mom and Dad can say no at any time, and can take tickets away for misbehavior. They can also give out extra tickets for good behavior.

1 Ticket = 30 minutes of Tech Time.

To Earn Extra Tickets:

  • 30 Min of reading
  • 30 min of extra homework time
  • 30 min of math practice
  • 30 min of Bible Study/ Reading
  • 30 min of EXTRA Chores
  • 30 min of writing

To Lose Tickets:

  • Using Tech without giving up a ticket
  • Use tech past the timer
  • Argue or whine about Tech time
  • Misbehavior or disobey.
Categories
Resources technology

Learning to Swim

In a world overflowing with technology, many parents feel ill-equipped to teach their kids how to use it wisely. This workshop session provides a clear model for helping the parents and leaders in your ministry navigate this crucial subject. Listen to “Learning to Swim: Helping Parents Navigate Raising Children in a Technology World,” presented by Jeremy Pettitt at the 2018 Children’s Pastors’ Conference in Orlando.

 

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Resources

Navigating Technology

The Following presentation was presented by Christina Jontra at Glenwood Church of Christ on January 28, 2018.

Reading Material

The following resources were compiled by Christina Jontra: Director of Digital Learning. Grace Community School.

Parents, Stop Teenage Privacy Now – Writer John Pavlovitz explains that mobile technology has changed how and with whom teenagers connect with and those changes mean that parents should invade teenager’s privacy in an effort to protect them.

“Big Brother”? No, It’s Parents — New York Times article discussing one parent’s experience monitoring her child’s online activity.

Facebook Age Requirement: Children Lying About How Old They Are May Put Peers At Risk — Interesting article that explains in simple terms how underaged children could put others at risk on Facebook.

lol . . . OMG! by Matt Ivester — Written for college students, but explains how to guard one’s online reputation well.

The Next Story by Tim Challies — “Explore how Christians can live in this new reality with character, virtue, and wisdom — and how we can respond to these revolutionary changes as followers of Christ in a digital age, learning to live faithfully as “the next story” unfolds.”

It’s Complicated the Social lives of networked teens by Danah Boyd — “In this eye-opening book, youth culture and technology expert Danah Boyd uncovers some of the major myths regarding teens’ use of social media.” Amazon.com

Why should you be concerned about the Location Services on your child’s phone?Digital photos have their own DNA. With free programs, and a click of the mouse, you can tell what camera was used to take a picture, what app was used to modify it, the settings used to capture a certain light, AND exactly where on a map the picture was taken.

Parents Need to Talk to Their Kids About the Website “Omegle” Now – Anne Marie Miller explain in blunt detail the dangers associated with the online video chat site Omegle. This post is shocking and eye-opening.

Apps Every Parent Needs to Know About – Snapchat – Anne Marie Miller explains in plain English the inherent problems with Snapchat.

What I Wish Every Parent Knew About Instagram – Tina M. the blogger-mom behind mothersniche.com writes about how she stumbled upon porn on Instagram when doing research on a DIY craft project.

Resources

  • Common Sense Media — read app reviews, Digital Citizenship resources, Cyberbullying resources
  • Yoursphere For Parents — Helping Families Live Healthy Digital Lives
  • “Keep Your Child Safe Online” — PC Magazine article reviews several filtering and monitoring software options
  • Hay There Social Media — website with many resources, including a blog and a Saving Face video course for parents
  • Fight The New Drug – the purpose of this website is to raise awareness about the harmful effects of pornography using only science, facts, and personal accounts.

Digital Is Different

This video, “Think Before You Post,” is a great visual representation showing that once something is posted on the internet, it can never be removed.

Privacy Settings

Understanding privacy settings for each social media platform you allow your child to use, is vitally important. In the physical realm, one of the ways parents protect their children is to be aware of who has access to their children at all times. We do that here at school when we run background checks on any adult who has contact with our students.

Disregarding privacy settings has the potential to anyone and everyone access to your child, and no one would advocate for that.

5 Ways to Safeguard Your Privacy on Instagram

How to Manage Privacy Settings on Social Media

Explained: What is Musical.ly

Parental Controls on iDevices

Apple devices allow parents to set up some basic restrictions. You can turn off apps, restrict the ability to install apps, and even set an age restrictions for apps, movies, and music.

The first step is to turn on the Restrictions. Go to Settings > General > Restrictions >select Enable Restrictions. The first time you do this you will be prompted to set a 4 digit passcode. Set a passcode you can remember.

Location Services and Geotagging?

Why should you be concerned about the Location Services on your child’s phone?Digital photos have their own DNA. With free programs, and a click of the mouse, you can tell what camera was used to take a picture, what app was used to modify it, the settings used to capture a certain light, AND exactly where on a map the picture was taken.

Monitoring and Filtering Options

Family Shield — Filter adult content from your home internet. OpenDNS offers a free and paid version of Family Shield.
Mobicip — Internet filtering for mobile devices
TeenSafe — Monitoring service that allows parents to monitor their child’s smartphone. Monitoring includes text messages, Instagram, WhatsApp, and Kik Messenger.

Extras

What is Instagram? videoCreate an Instagram account Click Here

Should you be concerned about Snapchat? article

How to use Snapchat Like a 14-Year Old Click Here

Open Letter to My Boys Regarding Technology — letter

Meeting Handouts — Click Here or Click Here

Christina’s Presentation — Click Here

Categories
Challenge Family Activity technology

Disconnect to Connect

Technology brings many benefits to our lives. But excessive screen time can create a flat, one-dimensional existence. We were made for the rich, three-dimensional experience of relationship with God and one another. So, while technology is great for some types of communication, it is no substitute for real-world, face-to-face connection.

The goal is not just less screen time, but more real connection. Start two simple strategies to shift the balance in your family life.

TECH-FREE ZONES

Choose several “tech-free zones” where the family agrees to put away devices in order to enhance real-life connection. Select from the following zones or come up with your own. Consider placing a basket in each location for everyone to drop their devices as they enter.

1. Mealtime: Include the table at home and in restaurants so that every mealtime can foster face-to-face conversation.

2. Drive Time: Rather than everyone retreating into his or her device, use the time driving together to connect, pray for the day ahead or hear about everyone’s high and low point during the day. (Some exceptions may apply, such as limited use during long distance travel, etc.)

3. Date Time: Give your undivided attention to your spouse during dates. It is ok if you need to check your phone to be sure the sitter is not trying to reach you, but then go right back to enjoying time together.

<h3>REAL CONNECTION IDEAS</h3>
While reducing tech time, increase the time you spend together as a couple, a family or with friends. Choose from the following ideas or come up with your own for making memories and conversation.
• Play a board game together
• Cook a meal together
• Play a sport together
• Go for a walk or bike ride together
• Read a book aloud to the children as they turn pages
• Do a service project together

Subscribe today to get these and other great ideas on how you can connect 3D in your inbox.

Categories
Challenge technology

Connected 3D

Technology brings many benefits to our lives. But excessive screen time can create a flat, one-dimensional existence. We were made for the rich, three-dimensional experience of relationship with God and one another. So, while technology is great for some types of communication, it is no substitute for real-world, face-to-face connection.

Do you control your devices or are they starting to control you? How about your family? In a culture where everyone seems more “connected” than ever, how do we nurture real connection with the most important people in
our lives?

Join us starting January 28th as we encourage families to replace distracting technology habits with healthy patterns by connecting 3D:

• Disconnect to Connect: Choose specific times and locations to consistently disconnect from devices in order to connect with God, family and friends.

• Deepen Internal Values: Model and coach your family toward God-honoring technology habits.

• Develop External Boundaries: Find and set the right safety and accountability strategy for yourself and everyone in your home.

Subscribe today to get these and other great ideas on how you can connect 3D in your inbox.

Categories
511 Scripture Reading Challenge

Reconciled – Daily Scripture Reading

Daily Scripture

This is why I kneel before the Father. Every ethnic group in heaven or on earth is recognized by him. I ask that he will strengthen you in your inner selves from the riches of his glory through the Spirit. I ask that Christ will live in your hearts through faith. As a result of having strong roots in love, I ask that you’ll have the power to grasp love’s width and length, height and depth, together with all believers. I ask that you’ll know the love of Christ that is beyond knowledge so that you will be filled entirely with the fullness of God.

Glory to God, who is able to do far beyond all that we could ask or imagine by his power at work within us; glory to him in the church and in Christ Jesus for all generations, forever and always. Amen. – Ephesians 3:14–21

Daily Devotional

Today’s Devotional was written by:Lance Bolay

Our Wednesday night prayer group has met to reflect on Ephesians 3:14–21 every week since September. This text records Paul’s prayer for the Christ-followers in Ephesus. Paul prefaces his prayer with, “For this reason…” What reason? In Christ, everything in heaven and on earth is being reconciled to God (Eph 1:10). There is cosmic renewal in Christ, and its effects are local and practical. There is a new humanity created by the Spirit of God through the death and resurrection of Jesus. Jew and non-Jew are now one in Christ. All people, no matter their ethnicity, can be at peace with one another, and the church is the practical embodiment of this new creation.

This is why Paul’s prayer is so important. The only way the church can live out its calling and purpose is if believers are strengthened in their inner being through the power of the Spirit, if by the Spirit Christ dwells in their hearts through faith, and if they are filled with the fullness of God. All of creation comes from God—every family in heaven and on earth takes its name from the Father (v. 14)—and the goal, telos, of creation is to be filled with the fullness of God. We come from God. We are meant to be reconciled back to God. But the only way to reach that goal is through the Spirit. Paul understands that the church is nothing without the Spirit. The church is empty without the Spirit. Creation and all of humanity disintegrates into chaos and death without the Spirit. The Spirit reconciles. The Spirit resurrects and gives new life. The Spirit brings wholeness and cosmic flourishing.

Reflection

  • How do you present yourself to the Spirit in order to receive the Spirit’s power?
  • How do you practice, in concrete and intentional ways, openness to the Spirit?
  • Do you pray for the Spirit to strengthen and revive other believers, as Paul did?
  • What is the evidence that the Spirit is strengthening your inner being? That Christ is dwelling in your heart?
  • That you are being filled with the fullness of God?

Read this verse in context:Ephesians 3

This is why I, Paul, am a prisoner of Christ for you Gentiles.

2 You’ve heard, of course, about the responsibility to distribute God’s grace, which God gave to me for you, right? 3 God showed me his secret plan[a] in a revelation, as I mentioned briefly before (4 when you read this, you’ll understand my insight into the secret plan[b] about Christ). 5 Earlier generations didn’t know this hidden plan that God has now revealed to his holy apostles and prophets through the Spirit. 6 This plan is that the Gentiles would be coheirs and parts of the same body, and that they would share with the Jews in the promises of God in Christ Jesus through the gospel. 7 I became a servant of the gospel because of the grace that God showed me through the exercise of his power.

8 God gave his grace to me, the least of all God’s people, to preach the good news about the immeasurable riches of Christ to the Gentiles. 9 God sent me to reveal the secret plan[c] that had been hidden since the beginning of time by God, who created everything. 10 God’s purpose is now to show the rulers and powers in the heavens the many different varieties of his wisdom through the church. 11 This was consistent with the plan he had from the beginning of time that he accomplished through Christ Jesus our Lord. 12 In Christ we have bold and confident access to God through faith in him.[d] 13 So then, I ask you not to become discouraged by what I’m suffering for you, which is your glory.

Paul’s prayer for the Ephesians
14 This is why I kneel before the Father. 15 Every ethnic group in heaven or on earth is recognized by him. 16 I ask that he will strengthen you in your inner selves from the riches of his glory through the Spirit. 17 I ask that Christ will live in your hearts through faith. As a result of having strong roots in love, 18 I ask that you’ll have the power to grasp love’s width and length, height and depth, together with all believers. 19 I ask that you’ll know the love of Christ that is beyond knowledge so that you will be filled entirely with the fullness of God.

20 Glory to God, who is able to do far beyond all that we could ask or imagine by his power at work within us; 21 glory to him in the church and in Christ Jesus for all generations, forever and always. Amen.

Common English Bible (CEB)

Copyright © 2011 by Common English Bible

Categories
511 Scripture Reading Challenge

Life to the Full – Daily Scripture Reading

Daily Scripture

The thief comes to steal, kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full. – John 10:10

Daily Devotional

Today’s Devotional was written by: Celeste Smith

Live life. If you have visited our home you might notice we have these words prominently displayed in our kitchen. These two words serve as a reminder to think about the words Jesus spoke in John 10:10. It would be impossible for me to speak on all the ways John 10:10 has meaning to our family; so I will share just what is on my heart today. The contrast in this passage is blaring. The thief does one thing and God does something entirely different. We can always expect He will. As life increases, death decreases. Have you noticed this? Perhaps even more inspiring is that we have been called to live a life that decreases death around us. We have been given the power, through Christ, to offer redemption where it once seemed impossible. We do this through our mercy, compassion, patience, love, faithfulness, and understanding.

These words are so special to me because I can remember so many times where the thief has come in my own life. He has sought to kill, steal, and destroy so much. I have seen him leave cherished friends feeling ravaged and hopeless. I have watched the thief walk away with more than seems fair. Often I hear of a situation and I can’t even see past what has been stolen, killed and destroyed. I’m glad the story doesn’t end there. We, as Christians, are living proof that God can breathe new life into the deadest of places. Forgiveness can heal immeasurable hurt. Love can heal unfathomable hate. Understanding can heal insurmountable division. Faith can cure unconquerable doubt.
Live life. In doing this, we will take part in the redemption of this world.

Read this verse in context: John 10

1 I assure you that whoever doesn’t enter into the sheep pen through the gate but climbs over the wall is a thief and an outlaw. 2 The one who enters through the gate is the shepherd of the sheep. 3 The guard at the gate opens the gate for him, and the sheep listen to his voice. He calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. 4 Whenever he has gathered all of his sheep, he goes before them and they follow him, because they know his voice. 5 They won’t follow a stranger but will run away because they don’t know the stranger’s voice.” 6 Those who heard Jesus use this analogy didn’t understand what he was saying.

I am the gate
7 So Jesus spoke again, “I assure you that I am the gate of the sheep. 8 All who came before me were thieves and outlaws, but the sheep didn’t listen to them. 9 I am the gate. Whoever enters through me will be saved. They will come in and go out and find pasture. 10 The thief enters only to steal, kill, and destroy. I came so that they could have life—indeed, so that they could live life to the fullest.

I am the good shepherd
11 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. 12 When the hired hand sees the wolf coming, he leaves the sheep and runs away. That’s because he isn’t the shepherd; the sheep aren’t really his. So the wolf attacks the sheep and scatters them. 13 He’s only a hired hand and the sheep don’t matter to him.

14 “I am the good shepherd. I know my own sheep and they know me, 15 just as the Father knows me and I know the Father. I give up my life for the sheep. 16 I have other sheep that don’t belong to this sheep pen. I must lead them too. They will listen to my voice and there will be one flock, with one shepherd.

17 “This is why the Father loves me: I give up my life so that I can take it up again. 18 No one takes it from me, but I give it up because I want to. I have the right to give it up, and I have the right to take it up again. I received this commandment from my Father.”

19 There was another division among the Jews because of Jesus’ words. 20 Many of them said, “He has a demon and has lost his mind. Why listen to him?” 21 Others said, “These aren’t the words of someone who has a demon. Can a demon heal the eyes of people who are blind?”

Jesus at the Festival of Dedication
22 The time came for the Festival of Dedication[a] in Jerusalem. It was winter, 23 and Jesus was in the temple, walking in the covered porch named for Solomon. 24 The Jewish opposition circled around him and asked, “How long will you test our patience? If you are the Christ, tell us plainly.”

25 Jesus answered, “I have told you, but you don’t believe. The works I do in my Father’s name testify about me, 26 but you don’t believe because you don’t belong to my sheep. 27 My sheep listen to my voice. I know them and they follow me. 28 I give them eternal life. They will never die, and no one will snatch them from my hand. 29 My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one is able to snatch them from my Father’s hand. 30 I and the Father are one.”

31 Again the Jewish opposition picked up stones in order to stone him. 32 Jesus responded, “I have shown you many good works from the Father. For which of those works do you stone me?”

33 The Jewish opposition answered, “We don’t stone you for a good work but for insulting God. You are human, yet you make yourself out to be God.”

34 Jesus replied, “Isn’t it written in your Law, I have said, you are gods?[b] 35 Scripture calls those to whom God’s word came gods, and scripture can’t be abolished. 36 So how can you say that the one whom the Father has made holy and sent into the world insults God because he said, ‘I am God’s Son’? 37 If I don’t do the works of my Father, don’t believe me. 38 But if I do them, and you don’t believe me, believe the works so that you can know and recognize that the Father is in me and I am in the Father.” 39 Again, they wanted to arrest him, but he escaped from them.

Jesus at the Jordan
40 Jesus went back across the Jordan to the place where John had baptized at first, and he stayed there. 41 Many people came to him. “John didn’t do any miraculous signs,” they said, “but everything John said about this man was true.” 42 Many believed in Jesus there.

Common English Bible (CEB)

Copyright © 2011 by Common English Bible

Categories
511 Scripture Reading Challenge

Struggled With God – Daily Scripture Reading

Daily Scripture

Then the man said, “Let me go, for it is daybreak.” But Jacob replied, “I will not let you go unless you bless me.” The man asked him, “What is your name?” “Jacob,” he answered. Then the man said, “Your name will no longer be Jacob, but Israel, because you have struggled with God and with humans and have overcome.” – Genesis 32:26–28

Daily Devotional

Today’s Devotional was written by: Steven Smith

I love the mountains. I love the big beautiful vistas and sweeping views. I love going places that are difficult to reach. The harder it is to get to a place the better. For me its one thing to drive up to a panoramic overlook, get out of the car and snap a few pictures. That will do in a pinch. But if you really want to see the true beauty of the mountains, you have to go to places that cars can’t reach. You have to walk. I have found the longer you walk, the better the views. There is something different about the view that comes at the end of a long day’s hike. When you sit down on a jagged rock and it feels like a lazy boy recliner. Take off your boots, rub your tired feet, and partake in nature the way God intended it. There is something about the struggle that makes a view that much more beautiful.

It reminds me of one of my favorite passages. In Genesis 32 we find Jacob in a very difficult situation. If you will recall, back at the beginning of their story, Jacob and Esau had their differences. Esau was a manly man who thought more about hunting and being outside than he did about God. Jacob was a Godly man, but didn’t always go about seeking God in very Christian ways. Jacob actually ends up stealing Esau’s birthright and lying to his father to receive a blessing intended for his brother. This doesn’t make Esau very happy. In fact, Esau feels a little murderous and Jacob ends up running from him for a good portion of his life.

It all comes to a head in Genesis 32 when Jacob gets word that Esau is coming for him with an army of 400 men. Jacob is worried and starts sending bribes trying to appease his brother’s anger. He ends up giving Esau just about everything he owns, sends his family away for their own protection, and then sits and waits alone.

That night, the Bible says, a man began wrestling with Jacob. They end up wrestling all night long, and soon discover neither of them can overpower the other. So the man disables Jacob’s hip causing him immense pain. But Jacob doesn’t give up, he just hangs on to the man refusing to let go until the man will bless him.

The Bible says:
“I will not let you go unless you bless me.” The man asked him, “What is your name?” “Jacob,” he answered. Then the man said, “Your name will no longer be Jacob, but Israel, because you have struggled with God and with humans and have overcome.” (Genesis 32:26–28)

It’s such a strange story. Jacob wrestles with a man, who is actually God, and ends up with a different name. A name that literally means “struggles with God.”

Have you ever struggled with God? Have you ever struggled with your faith or with doubt? How did you feel about it? A lot of people feel guilty about their struggles. When things are hard they feel like they are doing something wrong, or that they have taken a wrong turn somewhere, or even turned away from God. Is that what struggling signifies?

It’s interesting to me, because when I hike, I expect to struggle. I know that I can’t get to the places I truly want to be without struggling. Usually the harder the struggle, the better the payoff.

I can’t help but think that life is the same way. I can’t help but think that struggling is a necessity of life. That there are parts of life—good, worthwhile, beautiful parts of life—that only come after an intense struggle. If this is true about life shouldn’t it also be true about faith? Could it be that there are aspects of faith—good, worthwhile, beautiful aspects of faith—that only come after an intense struggle?

Did you notice anything else about Jacob? He didn’t win his little wrestling match with God. At least not in the traditional sense. Yet God says “you have struggled with God and with man and have overcome.”

So how did Jacob overcome? He refused to let go. Through all his struggles with God—through painful injury and overwhelming exhaustion—Jacob never let go.

That is my prayer for you. No matter how you are struggling with God, my prayer is that you will hang on. That even when the struggling is the hardest, and you feel the exhaustion of life and faith crumbling around you, cling to God and you will overcome.

Read this verse in context: Genesis 32

Jacob went on his way, and God’s messengers approached him. 2 When Jacob saw them, he said, “This is God’s camp,” and he named that sacred place Mahanaim.[a] 3 Jacob sent messengers ahead of him to his brother Esau, toward the land of Seir, the open country of Edom. 4 He gave them these orders: “Say this to my master Esau. This is the message of your servant Jacob: ‘I’ve lived as an immigrant with Laban, where I’ve stayed till now. 5 I own cattle, donkeys, flocks, men servants, and women servants. I’m sending this message to my master now to ask that he[b] be kind.’”

6 The messengers returned to Jacob and said, “We went out to your brother Esau, and he’s coming to meet you with four hundred men.”

7 Jacob was terrified and felt trapped, so he divided the people with him, and the flocks, cattle, and camels, into two camps. 8 He thought, If Esau meets the first camp and attacks it, at least one camp will be left to escape.

9 Jacob said, “Lord, God of my father Abraham, God of my father Isaac, who said to me, ‘Go back to your country and your relatives, and I’ll make sure things go well for you,’ 10 I don’t deserve how loyal and truthful you’ve been to your servant. I went away across the Jordan with just my staff, but now I’ve become two camps. 11 Save me from my brother Esau! I’m afraid he will come and kill me, the mothers, and their children. 12 You were the one who told me, ‘I will make sure things go well for you, and I will make your descendants like the sand of the sea, so many you won’t be able to count them.’”

13 Jacob spent that night there. From what he had acquired, he set aside a gift for his brother Esau: 14 two hundred female goats and twenty male goats, two hundred ewes and twenty rams, 15 thirty nursing camels with their young, forty cows and ten bulls, and twenty female donkeys and ten male donkeys. 16 He separated these herds and gave them to his servants. He said to them, “Go ahead of me and put some distance between each of the herds.” 17 He ordered the first group, “When my brother Esau meets you and asks you, ‘Who are you with? Where are you going? And whose herds are these in front of you?’ 18 say, ‘They are your servant Jacob’s, a gift sent to my master Esau. And Jacob is actually right behind us.’” 19 He also ordered the second group, the third group, and everybody following the herds, “Say exactly the same thing to Esau when you find him. 20 Say also, ‘Your servant Jacob is right behind us.’” Jacob thought, I may be able to pacify Esau with the gift I’m sending ahead. When I meet him, perhaps he will be kind to me. 21 So Jacob sent the gift ahead of him, but he spent that night in the camp.

Jacob wrestles with God
22 Jacob got up during the night, took his two wives, his two women servants, and his eleven sons, and crossed the Jabbok River’s shallow water. 23 He took them and everything that belonged to him, and he helped them cross the river. 24 But Jacob stayed apart by himself, and a man wrestled with him until dawn broke. 25 When the man saw that he couldn’t defeat Jacob, he grabbed Jacob’s thigh and tore a muscle in Jacob’s thigh as he wrestled with him. 26 The man said, “Let me go because the dawn is breaking.”

But Jacob said, “I won’t let you go until you bless me.”

27 He said to Jacob, “What’s your name?” and he said, “Jacob.” 28 Then he said, “Your name won’t be Jacob any longer, but Israel,[c] because you struggled with God and with men and won.”

29 Jacob also asked and said, “Tell me your name.”

But he said, “Why do you ask for my name?” and he blessed Jacob there. 30 Jacob named the place Peniel,[d] “because I’ve seen God face-to-face, and my life has been saved.” 31 The sun rose as Jacob passed Penuel, limping because of his thigh. 32 Therefore, Israelites don’t eat the tendon attached to the thigh muscle to this day, because he grabbed Jacob’s thigh muscle at the tendon.

Common English Bible (CEB)

Copyright © 2011 by Common English Bible

Categories
511 Scripture Reading Challenge

WORD 511 – Final Week

This Sunday, November 13, concludes our WORD 511 Campaign at Glenwood Church of Christ. For the last 50 days we have encouraged members and families to to develop daily scripture reading habits utilizing a number of resources and ideas. As part of our campaign we are giving away a $500 gift card to Great Wolf Lodge in Grapevine, Texas. This Wednesday, November 9, is the last day to enter the giveaway. Entry is simple. Participate in the WORD 511 challenge by:

  • 5—Five times a week, each family member studies God’s Word.
  • 1—Once a week, spouses connect to talk about what they are learning in God’s Word.
  • 1—Once a week, the family connects and everyone talks about what they are learning in God’s Word.

Then let us know you and your family are actively reading the Bible using the 511 model. That’s all there is too it. You can enter at the STAND@Home center or online here: https://glenwood.ccbchurch.com/form_response.php?id=157

Even though our campaign is ending, it is our hope that your family will continue to use the resources and ideas introduced in the WORD 511 campaign. While it may be too late to enter the giveaway, it’s not too late to start developing healthy scripture reading habits. The WORD 511 resources will continue to be available here at STANDatHome.com. Click here for more details.

Free Tools and Resources:

WORD511 Family Guide

Verse Of The Week Card

Children’s WORD Journal

Categories
511 Scripture Reading Challenge

All The More – Daily Scripture Reading

Daily Scripture

Joseph had a dream, and when he told it to his brothers, they hated him all the more. – Genesis 37:5

Daily Devotional

Today’s Devotional was written by:Celeste Smith

Have you ever just hated someone? I think if we were asked this question we would all get a little squeamish. I would probably start using words like “dislike” or “not a fan of” to make my hatred a little more palatable. But if I were honest about how I feel there is probably at least one person out there that I have felt hatred for. Maybe more. The Bible has some strong things to say about hate and anger. 1 John 2:9 says that we can’t hate our brother and live in the light, 1 John 3:15 tells us that is we hate our brother we are murderers, and 1 John 4:19-21 says we can’t love God without loving our brothers. Ouch.

What is interesting about this verse in Genesis 37:5 is that it sort of speaks to a Biblical truth that God is addressing in his warnings about our anger: What we think on tends to grow. Joseph’s brothers hated Joseph “all the more” after hearing his dream. Which means they hated him at least a little to start with and it just expanded from there. I have witnessed a hatred snowball grow in many churches. It starts with one thing someone did that might have hurt or offended and it just grows and grows and grows. After fifteen years of working in ministry I have sort of just accepted this as “the way it is.” How sad. Because there is another truth about God’s people. We have another option. We can also grow love. Philippians 1:9 tells us that God has gifted believers with an abounding love. In Genesis, Joseph’s brothers grew hatred to the point of murder. Maybe your hatred for a person isn’t quite that bad, but is it moving you toward God or away from him? When we abound in hatred we are left with corruption, fear, pride, curses, pain, sadness, and a damaged view of God. In contrast, when we abound in love we see an increase in grace, love, trust, confidence, our own humility, blessings, goodness, peace, joy, and God’s glory. It seems like a no-brainer. I would pick the second list any day! We get to choose; what will we grow?

Read this verse in context: Genesis 37

Jacob lived in the land where his father had stayed, the land of Canaan.

2 This is the account of Jacob’s family line.

Joseph, a young man of seventeen, was tending the flocks with his brothers, the sons of Bilhah and the sons of Zilpah, his father’s wives, and he brought their father a bad report about them.

3 Now Israel loved Joseph more than any of his other sons, because he had been born to him in his old age; and he made an ornate[a] robe for him. 4 When his brothers saw that their father loved him more than any of them, they hated him and could not speak a kind word to him.

5 Joseph had a dream, and when he told it to his brothers, they hated him all the more. 6 He said to them, “Listen to this dream I had: 7 We were binding sheaves of grain out in the field when suddenly my sheaf rose and stood upright, while your sheaves gathered around mine and bowed down to it.”

8 His brothers said to him, “Do you intend to reign over us? Will you actually rule us?” And they hated him all the more because of his dream and what he had said.

9 Then he had another dream, and he told it to his brothers. “Listen,” he said, “I had another dream, and this time the sun and moon and eleven stars were bowing down to me.”

10 When he told his father as well as his brothers, his father rebuked him and said, “What is this dream you had? Will your mother and I and your brothers actually come and bow down to the ground before you?” 11 His brothers were jealous of him, but his father kept the matter in mind.

Joseph Sold by His Brothers
12 Now his brothers had gone to graze their father’s flocks near Shechem, 13 and Israel said to Joseph, “As you know, your brothers are grazing the flocks near Shechem. Come, I am going to send you to them.”

“Very well,” he replied.

14 So he said to him, “Go and see if all is well with your brothers and with the flocks, and bring word back to me.” Then he sent him off from the Valley of Hebron.

When Joseph arrived at Shechem, 15 a man found him wandering around in the fields and asked him, “What are you looking for?”

16 He replied, “I’m looking for my brothers. Can you tell me where they are grazing their flocks?”

17 “They have moved on from here,” the man answered. “I heard them say, ‘Let’s go to Dothan.’”

So Joseph went after his brothers and found them near Dothan. 18 But they saw him in the distance, and before he reached them, they plotted to kill him.

19 “Here comes that dreamer!” they said to each other. 20 “Come now, let’s kill him and throw him into one of these cisterns and say that a ferocious animal devoured him. Then we’ll see what comes of his dreams.”

21 When Reuben heard this, he tried to rescue him from their hands. “Let’s not take his life,” he said. 22 “Don’t shed any blood. Throw him into this cistern here in the wilderness, but don’t lay a hand on him.” Reuben said this to rescue him from them and take him back to his father.

23 So when Joseph came to his brothers, they stripped him of his robe—the ornate robe he was wearing— 24 and they took him and threw him into the cistern. The cistern was empty; there was no water in it.

25 As they sat down to eat their meal, they looked up and saw a caravan of Ishmaelites coming from Gilead. Their camels were loaded with spices, balm and myrrh, and they were on their way to take them down to Egypt.

26 Judah said to his brothers, “What will we gain if we kill our brother and cover up his blood? 27 Come, let’s sell him to the Ishmaelites and not lay our hands on him; after all, he is our brother, our own flesh and blood.” His brothers agreed.

28 So when the Midianite merchants came by, his brothers pulled Joseph up out of the cistern and sold him for twenty shekels[b] of silver to the Ishmaelites, who took him to Egypt.

29 When Reuben returned to the cistern and saw that Joseph was not there, he tore his clothes. 30 He went back to his brothers and said, “The boy isn’t there! Where can I turn now?”

31 Then they got Joseph’s robe, slaughtered a goat and dipped the robe in the blood. 32 They took the ornate robe back to their father and said, “We found this. Examine it to see whether it is your son’s robe.”

33 He recognized it and said, “It is my son’s robe! Some ferocious animal has devoured him. Joseph has surely been torn to pieces.”

34 Then Jacob tore his clothes, put on sackcloth and mourned for his son many days. 35 All his sons and daughters came to comfort him, but he refused to be comforted. “No,” he said, “I will continue to mourn until I join my son in the grave.” So his father wept for him.

36 Meanwhile, the Midianites[c] sold Joseph in Egypt to Potiphar, one of Pharaoh’s officials, the captain of the guard.

Common English Bible (CEB)

Copyright © 2011 by Common English Bible